Radish Dill Leaves Paratha

Monday, February 27, 2017

With Indian Vegetables appearing more often and in good quantity too, I am having a gala time cooking all my favourite veg dishes. Until recently, White Icicle Radish used to show up in very limited numbers, unlike  Cherry Belle that was always available in abundance. Wondering what are these names? :-) Apparently there are at least five common radishes and it is good to know so you know what you have. Most of my radish stock went into Sambhar and I was left with just one radish that I used to make this Radish Dill leaves flatbread.

Not many are Radish fans because of its pungent smell and taste. One of my friend back in school used to have raw radish salad for lunch and she used to dare us to have it. As I had no clue how it would taste raw, I agreed to have a piece. I still remember the mild burning aftertaste it left in my mouth for a very short period. It was not bad but I never had them raw after that. Apparently, raw radish is very nutritious and there is a Chinese proverb to back that - "eating pungent radish and drinking hot tea, let the starved doctors beg on their knees."  It is high time for a haul of radish?

Radish Dill Leaves Paratha

Radishes are an excellent source of antioxidants, electrolytes, minerals, vitamins and dietary fibre. But then when it is good for health, it ain't good for tongue :-) That is why I chose to add my favourite flavour packed greens - Dill leaves as another main ingredient in this flatbread, as they make a great pair!

Making any Parathas requires the filling to be moisture free and the same is followed here too. Radish Dill Leaves Parathas are excellent for brunch, lunch or dinner served with any veg, meat or lentil curries and yoghurt dips or just as is. I had these two in the pic as is - just rolled and munched :-)

Radish Dill Leaves Paratha

Yields: 6  to 7 Parathas

INGREDIENTS

3/4 cup grated/shredded white radish, loosely packed
1 1/2 cup wheat flour
2 green chillies, very finely chopped
1/2 cup chopped fresh dill leaves
salt to taste
1 teaspoon oil
water to knead, if required
a bowl of all-purpose flour - to use while kneading, resting and rolling
Ghee to roast the parathas

METHOD:

Stir in a dash of salt to the grated radish and keep aside for at least 30 minutes. Using your hand, squeeze out the moisture from the grated radish into the bowl that you will use to make the dough. Repeat until the grated radish is almost moisture free and dry.

In the bowl of radish water, add the wheat flour, salt, grated radish, chopped dill leaves and chopped green chillies. Bring the mixture together by kneading constantly as that would release more moisture from the grated radish and spread the contents uniformly. Only when you do see the need of water, use little by little until you get a soft not too sticky dough. Coat the dough with flour and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Grease your palm with oil and knead the dough a few times and make 7 to 8 equal sized dough balls. Dust each of the dough balls with flour and keep them covered. Heat the tawa on a medium to high flame so that it is ready by the time you roll one.

Dust your rolling pin and board with some flour and gently roll to make approx. 6-inch disc. Place the rolled out Radish paratha on the hot tawa on medium to high flame (you can start rolling the next one while this gets cooked, but keep an eye) Drizzle about 1 or 2 teaspoons of ghee on both sides and flip and cook till the paratha is evenly cooked and roasted all sides.

Serving ideas: yoghurt and lime pickle, labneh, and any dals will also go well with this Radish Dill Leaves paratha.

Radish Dill Leaves Paratha

You may wonder why squeeze and then add back the grated radish? Trust me, if we add any grated radish, papaya, bottle gourd directly to the dough, you will end up with a sloppy dough and may have to use a lot of flour. This method will only ensure that the dough is easy to work and uses very less to no flour while rolling.

You can also make the radish dill filling and use that to stuff and roll like an Aloo Paratha or Raw Papaya Paratha and the likes.


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